Kaf Grooming

Anthony Vivolo, CEO with Kaf Grooming

What inspired you to start your line?

Over the years we became aware of the lack of high quality men’s grooming products, which inspired us to create the Kaf line. Here at Kaf we truly believe that your styling product of choice should not only style your hair to perfection, but also be beneficial to your hair’s overall health. Our goal was to create a product that could achieve both. That is why we developed all of our products with active botanicals to not only strengthen and protect your hair at the cellular level, but also give you the confidence and look you desire.

Kaf Grooming

How do you test your products before you sell them?

We feel strongly against the use of cosmetic testing on animals. All of our products go through skin and eye safety testing conducted by an independent laboratory. In addition to safety testing we put our products through stability testing to ensure that our products remain stable and active for upwards of two years in various temperatures and conditions. Testing the styling capabilities was the fun part, with that being said perfecting our featured styling products took over two and half years! We wanted to make certain we produced high quality products and weren’t satisfied until we were confident that our products achieved what was promised on the label.

Kaf Grooming

What do you consider the most important component of a hair product?

This is an industry that is very diluted to say the least, diluted with products that solely focus on the styling aspect and not necessarily the effects on your hair. Due to this, we believe that the most important component to any hair product is the health benefits. Our goal was to deliver a product that in addition to styling, also revitalized, strengthened, and protected your hair.

Kaf Grooming

Right now what celebrity has the best hair in terms of style and fitting their personal style?

This may not answer your question in terms of “right now” but Leonardo Dicaprio in “Great Gatsby”… that’s hair.

Kaf Grooming

How do you determine how much product to use per different style and cut?

That is the beauty of Kaf products; we like to think that we can achieve any look that you desire with our products. American Select is our “uncommonly versatile” styling cream that enables you to style your hair freely to achieve a more natural look. We suggest starting with a dime size amount for a lighter hold. Supreme Brew is our “superior hold ideal shine” pomade; we recommend this for people looking for a stronger hold and optimal dimensional sheen.

Kaf Grooming
Kaf Grooming

What styling tools can’t you live without?

For me it’s my comb. I have two, one for everyday and one for travel.

For the latest new and product updates, visit the Kaf website.

Templeton Rye review

Templeton Rye review

Templeton Rye review

If you had too much Irish whiskey last night and need a bit of “hair of the dog” go see if you local liquor store has a bottle of Templeton Rye whiskey and sip on some while reading our review.

Templeton Rye refers to rye whiskey originally made in Templeton, Iowa during the prohibition era as a way for farmers in the Carroll County area to supplement their income. Made of 95 percent rye and amber in color, it was considered to be of particularly high quality and was popular in Chicago, Omaha, and Kansas City speakeasies. It was said to be the Al Capone’s drink of choice. There is a lot of history behind the prohibition era whiskey, if you want to know more check out the Templeton Rye website for info and recipes. In the recent past there was a bit of controversy about the origination of the whiskey… Iowa or Indiana. In the end, who cares, they make a damn fine sipping whiskey and that is all Ansel and Opie needs.

Nose: Dry, grassy, natural spice

Taste: Hint of caramel, butterscotch, toffee and allspice.

Finish: Balanced, clean and silky smooth.

 

Traditional Old Fashioned

Templeton Rye review

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 OZ.TEMPLETON RYE
  • 2 DASHES ANGOSTURA AROMATIC BITTERS
  • 1 TSP.DEMERARA SUGAR
  • SIMPLE SYRUP
  • ORANGE AND CHERRY MASH

INSTRUCTIONS

Dissolve demerara sugar in hot water. Add Templeton Rye, bitters and ice. Stir until properly chilled and strain into an Old Fashioned glass with a couple of ice cubes. Garnish with a large orange disc or twist.

The Capone

Templeton Rye review

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 OZ.TEMPLETON RYE
  • 3/4 OZ.GRAND MARNIER
  • 1 OZ.CHAMPAGNE
  • DASHOF BITTERS

INSTRUCTIONS

Place Templeton Rye, Grand Marnier and bitters into a cocktail shaker. Vigorously shake to combine the mixture. Strain into a martini glass and then add champagne. Garnish with a lemon twist.

Templeton Rye review

Jacob Burton: Industry Insider, male model

Jacob Burton: Industry Insider, male model

Jacob Burton

How were you discovered?

I had a major accident in college that left me debilitated for a while actually. I broke my spine and more of my body, so I had plenty of time to lay and think. I was bored and unhappy in college. The injury changed my perspective on life and I always enjoyed acting so I was looking at ways I could seriously get into the industry from Knoxville (where I went to school in Tennessee) and still finish up my bachelors. My mom had always supported it and I had seen a lot of big name actors/actresses got their start in modeling because it really helps get comfortable in front of the camera and to perform. I submitted digitals to an agency in Atlanta called Chosen Model Management because it was a close enough drive from school for quick trips and a decent enough market to begin in a field I knew nothing about! From there I got scouted by D’management in Milan and voila!

Jacob Burton

What does it feel like to be on the runway?

I get the same nervous energy, adrenaline pump I would get from stepping on the mat to wrestle people. All eyes on you…it can be exhilarating and terrifying at the same time because I don’t think there’s anything particularly great about my walk!

Jacob Burton

What do you prefer commercial or runway work and why?

Commercial.  The atmosphere around fashion week can be exciting but its pretty basic, commercials or editorials allow you to move more freely and be expressive.

Jacob Burton

Who have you worked for, do you have a favorite client, why? 

I’ve done Maxim Italia, GQ, Esquire, Paper Magazine, Suit Supply, Nautica, Gant, Espirit, Gildan, Hugo Boss, a couple department stores etc. to name a few. The magazines are always so fun to shoot for…GQ shot in the World Trade Center which was an amazing experience…But Kohl’s always treats me so well and it’s like a reunion to team back up with all their stylists and creatives.

Jacob Burton

What is the most interesting shoot you have done?

I did an editorial in upstate NY after that “blizzard” last year and with the wind chill it was -11 that day. We were out in a barn for several hours that was not insulated and I was shooting outside with this incredibly beautiful horse. I remember hopping off him at one point and thinking my ankles were going to snap, the cold was unreal but we got some incredibly beautiful shots! Or, in Miami I was shooting for a German client during the season and we had a 6 am call time. The whole crew got together and rode early to the Everglades where we switched to airboats and took a long tour to an old cabin on a little island where we shot hiking gear for the first half of the day. Cruising along and seeing the alligators was really cool and that was my first airboat experience! Or one of my clients is a designer from Nicaragua, Jorge Vega Umana. He asked me to walk in his show in his country and flew me out to Menagua where I opened and closed in front of a massive audience, and was interviewed on TV. But after that we had 3 days to see his home country. We explored Grenada, hiked a volcano, swam in a lagoon in the mountains, and met some incredible incredible people. It was one of the best weeks of my life!

Jacob Burton

Favorite brands?

Right now I’m on a denim kick, I love 3x1. John Varvatos makes some of my favorite shirts though.

Jacob Burton

To see more images or book Jacob, visit D’management.

Cody Road Bourbon review

Cody Road Bourbon review

Cody Road Bourbon review

Whenever I travel I make it a point to shop, eat and drink local. Well, that’s no different when I am home, skip the chains and support your hometown business. That said Mississippi River Distilling is at the top of my list for favorite bourbons. Truth be told their gin is my all time favorite that I highly recommend but we’ll save that for another time and stick with whiskies for a bit. The distillery, and its location in LeClaire Iowa, have an interesting history and story. Cody Road, named after the road the distillery is on (which is named after Buffalo Bill Cody). If you’re traveling East on Interstate 80 I recommend a quick stop just before crossing into Illinois. LeClaire is a quaint town with a lot to offer.

Cody Road Bourbon review

Cody Road bourbon is made form a mash of 70% corn from LeClaire, 20% wheat and 10% unmalted barley from Reynolds, IL. In fact everything they put in a bottle is locally grown. Aged for two years in newly charred 30 gallon oak barrels (not quite locally made but floated down the Mississippi) and hand bottled. A detail you only get with a small craft distillery are the batch and bottle number hand written on the label which you can look up on the MRDC website and read the batch notes.

Cody Road Bourbon is a flavor and aroma experience unlike any other. Sweetness of corn, light fruit from wheat and a grassy, nutty finish from the unmalted barley. Vanilla and caramel from the oak dance around the sweet grain. Bottled at 90 proof, this bourbon has enough kick to know it’s bourbon, but a beautifully smooth finish. It is a grain forward whiskey and remarkably unique.

Best enjoyed neat.

 

Visit the website to see all the spirits they offer and buy some swag.

Cody Road Bourbon review

Luis Francisco, creator of VALVOELITE

VALVOELITE, luxurious, durable menswear.

How did you get your start in the industry?

As a kid I became completely infatuated with the design and construction of clothing. My brother use to paint on Tee shirts. I remember seeing that and going “wow I can make my own clothes”. I went from graphic designing to sewing my own samples. I started painting on tee shirts but it wasn’t enough. It drove me to heat pressing tee shirts. When I got my heat press is when I started doing custom tee shirts for people. Eventually I got bored of it and took some time to learn graphic design and got into screen-printing. I went and got an internship at a screen printing shop in Brooklyn. When I first started graphic designing tee shirts it was horrible. I remember trying to sell my designs to people and getting that, I don’t want to break your heart, face lol. But after years of doing random graphic design jobs and buying books and self-teaching myself, I developed my own style. I started paying attention to design composition which made me fall in love even more. I was a kid just hustling Tee shirts in NYC. Someone saw my Tee shirts on a band that played at SxSW and I just thought it was the coolest thing in the world. I’ve never been to Texas but my clothes have. I picked up sewing and started selling my own cut and trim pieces. By this time I established my own clientele base.I was a teen becoming and adult, not knowing what I wanted to do in life I took some time off and went to school for engineering. After I got my A.S in engineering I didn’t continues school because I wasn’t passionate about it. I started working on fashion here and there. Through some networks I got the opportunity to design for a few brands. Many of them were used at their fashion shows. After that I decided that this is my life’s journey.

VALVOELITE

Can you tell us how you started your own brand?

I started selling custom designs to people, and then eventually decided that I was a part of a culture that was missing in fashion, the perspective of fashion from my background. I came up with the name Valvoelite when I was 14. That was the first name that popped in my head and it was so different and weird. I think that’s when I was my most creative. I use that name to remind myself why I do this. I built a reputation for selling quality goods. Lil by lil, one customer at a time a brand was built.

VALVOELITE

Where do you draw inspiration?

I go to a lot of trade shows. I like looking at fabrics and I can spend hours looking at fashion shows. But sometimes the most inspiring thing is to live. When you have a story that can relate to people and you express that in your art, people instantly become attracted to it. I designed a shirt that had circles on the lower half of it. The inspiration came from trying to find myself. Comparing the circles to life, everyone is one individual circle but when we all come together there is a bigger picture. We can’t see it until we all come together. It’s kind of like, why do giant circular planets exist? We don’t know why but there is a reason.

VALVOELITE

Are there any particular trends or designers you absolutely love right now and why?

I’m a big fan of Thom Browne and Tim Coppens. They are both very different but I like the wearable fashion they design. Thom’s style is more a high end professional aesthetic. Tim has this street culture with high fashion elegance style.

VALVOELITE

What are your plans for the future of the brand?

We care going to start working on collections very soon. By next year I see us doing runway shows.

VALVOELITE

Who is your ideal customer?

The ideal customer would be someone who takes their time to learn about Valvoelite products. We enjoy customers that take their time to investigate why we do things a certain way. A man who enjoys quality, style, and durability.

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